Mae M. Ngai

520 Fayerweather Hall

212-854-2518
Office Hours :
416 Hamilton Hall - Thursdays 10am-12pm
Mae M. Ngai
Co-Director, Lung Family Professor of Asian American Studies and Professor of History

Mae M. Ngai, Professor of History and Lung Family Professor of Asian American Studies, is a U.S. legal and political historian interested in questions of immigration, citizenship, and nationalism. She received her Ph.D. from Columbia in 1998 and taught at the University of Chicago before returning to Columbia in 2006. Ngai is author of Impossible Subjects: Illegal Aliens and the Making of Modern America (Princeton 2004), which won six awards, including the Frederick Jackson Turner prize (best first book) from the OAH and the Littleton Griswold prize (best book in legal history) from the AHA. She has held fellowships from the Social Science Research Council, NYU Law School, Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation, and Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton. Ngai has written on immigration history and policy matters for TheWashington Post, The New York Times, Los Angeles Times, The Nation, and The Boston Review. Before becoming a historian, Ngai was a labor-union organizer and educator in New York City, working for District 65-UAW and the Consortium for Worker Education. Professor Ngai is now working on two projects: The Tape Family and the Origins of the Chinese American Middle Class, a family biography of Chinese American immigrant brokers and interpreters, forthcoming from Houghton Mifflin Harcourt in 2010; and The Chinese Mining Diaspora, 1848-1908, a study of Chinese gold miners in the nineteenth-century North American West, Australia, and South Africa.

Mae M. Ngai
Mae M. Ngai
Co-Director, Lung Family Professor of Asian American Studies and Professor of History

520 Fayerweather Hall

212-854-2518
Office Hours :
416 Hamilton Hall - Thursdays 10am-12pm

Mae M. Ngai, Professor of History and Lung Family Professor of Asian American Studies, is a U.S. legal and political historian interested in questions of immigration, citizenship, and nationalism. She received her Ph.D. from Columbia in 1998 and taught at the University of Chicago before returning to Columbia in 2006. Ngai is author of Impossible Subjects: Illegal Aliens and the Making of Modern America (Princeton 2004), which won six awards, including the Frederick Jackson Turner prize (best first book) from the OAH and the Littleton Griswold prize (best book in legal history) from the AHA. She has held fellowships from the Social Science Research Council, NYU Law School, Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation, and Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton. Ngai has written on immigration history and policy matters for TheWashington Post, The New York Times, Los Angeles Times, The Nation, and The Boston Review. Before becoming a historian, Ngai was a labor-union organizer and educator in New York City, working for District 65-UAW and the Consortium for Worker Education. Professor Ngai is now working on two projects: The Tape Family and the Origins of the Chinese American Middle Class, a family biography of Chinese American immigrant brokers and interpreters, forthcoming from Houghton Mifflin Harcourt in 2010; and The Chinese Mining Diaspora, 1848-1908, a study of Chinese gold miners in the nineteenth-century North American West, Australia, and South Africa.

CSER continues to be Columbia's main interdisciplinary space for the study of ethnicity and race and their implications for thinking about culture, power, hierarchy, social identities, and political communities. The Center also offers a wide range of public programming, including Artist at the Center, Indigenous Forum, and Latino Public Speaker Series and the Transnational Asian/American Speaker Series. CSER's most recent spaces include the Media and Idea Lab and Gallery at the Center, a space dedicated to curating artistic and thematic exhibits around the Center’s key areas of interest.
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 420 Hamilton Hall, MC 2880
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